Toy Sewing Machines 
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Baby  from Japan
Bremer and Bruckmann Colibri
E M G Comet
French Tinplate
Grain
Lead
Muller 4
Muller 12
Singer 20
Singer Sewhandy 
 Russian Chainstitch
Vulcan Featherweight
Vulcan Junior
Vulcan Countess
The Singer Sewhandy is a very high specification childs machine. Singer produced these with the idea that girls would grow up to buy the real thing. For collectors there are 4 main versions of the Singer 20 machines. The original Singer 20-1’s were first sold in 1910 with 4 spoke handwheels. In 1914 the second version had an 7 spoked handwheel and had tension discs added. Then in 1926 numbers were stamped onto the machine to indicate the threading path. In the 1950’s the 4th major change (model 20-10) saw a completely different look to the machine with an aluminium body with rectangular base, a full width stitch plate and an enclosed mechanism. This was also known as the Singer 20 Sewhandy which came in standard black, tan or cream and very rarely in red or blue. Later variations of the Model 20 Sewhandy included an electric motor drive built into the base. In the 1970’s Singer resurrected the model 20, manufacturing it at their factory in Turkey.These were identical to the 1926 models and were known as the K20. These can be distinguished from the original model 20’s made in the 1920’s and 30’s by a ‘Made in Turkey’ decal under the main Singer USA decal on the rear of the machine body. The Turkish K20's were sold in a small bentwood case which has a metal Red S style badge rivetted to one side. Most Singer 20 toy sewing machines use a short 24x1 needle which has flat shank fitted to the right, so that the needle is threaded from left to right. However, some of the later Sewhandy models (40K & 50D made in UK) use type 24x3 needles. These are obsolete and very hard to find if replacements are ever required. 24x3 needles are physically the same sizeas the 24x1 except that the flat on the shank is on the same side as the groove up the side of tas the 24x1 except that the flat on the shank is on the same side as the groove up the side of the needle.
Circa: 1950       Top
First marketed in 1910, this early version Singer No 20 was sold as both a toy and adult miniature. The design underwent several improvements. By the mid 1900s, many companies had cloned the machine, with some insisting that it was not a toy.
Circa: 1935
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The Colibri is a very well engineered toy from Bremer & Bruckmann, Braunschweig, Germany. It is one of only three toy models known from the Bremer & Bruckmann company. The other two are an earlier Colibri and the Lilliput, identical in design but with slightly more ornate decals. There is a winged logo on the workplate with a back to back double B. It uses the Gibbs rotating hook to form a twisted chain stich and has a storage area revealed when the top folds back. The company was established in 1871 to 1922 and was originally called Bremer & Co. In 1876 the company was renamed Bremer & Brückmann.
Circa: 1880
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This is the Muller Model 12, chain stitch, from F W Muller, Berlin. It is a very high quality toy employing the Gibbs rotating hook..
Circa: 1880
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This sewing machine is about 7 1/2 inches long, 7 inches tall and 4 1/2 inches deep. The sewing machine has markings on the stitchplate that read "BABY" and a circle with Paris in the middle and JC, LP and RW in a circle around Paris. There is another triangular marking on the top part of the base that reads "J.C. France". It employs a simple chain stitch mechanism which, on this machine, no longer works..
Circa: 1920
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There are no identifying marks on this but I believe it to be a Muller (or Meuller) number 4. It is very like the number 5 but with a different base. The decoration is identical to many Muller number 5 machines. It uses a looper to form a simple chain stitch.
Circa: 1905
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This is a Baby made in Japan just after the second world war. Although it has also been auctioned as a model manufactured by J.C Unis in Paris in the 1920's.
Circa: 1945
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Green Grain Toy sewing machine. Earnest Leslie Grain worked for Wilcox & Gibbs. On leaving he started up on his own in Clinton Street Nottinham. Resembling the Singer 20 this green model appeared from about 1950.
Circa: 1955
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Lead - Similar to the earlier Singer 20 but made in Japan probably in the 1950's.
Circa: 1950
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I have no information on this except that it was supposed to have been imported from Russia shortly after the collapse of the Berlin Wall. It is not very well made. There is no access to the area under the plate so it is probably a simple chain stitch.
Circa: 1950
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This Vulcan is a cast alloy toy sewing machine, resembling the Singer Featherweight. It was made at the Cyldon factory, Fleet Lane, Poole, Dorset. Unlike the later Junior and Countess it attempts to make a twisted chainstitch using a tinplate version of the Gibbs rotating hook. There is a folding tinplate worktable and a tension system similar to that on the mark one based on the Singer 20.
Although there is no model name it does carry the words Vulcan Made in England on the arm and on the bed there is a silver plate with the company logo depicting an embossed cotton reel and needle.
Sydney S Bird started the company at Enfield in Essex before moving to Dorset in 1953. Their first machine closely resembled the Singer 20, followed by a model collectors call the Featherweight, after the Singer Featherweight, and then the futuristic looking Junior to be followed by the Countess and the electric versions called the Classic and Regal. Circa 1950.      Top
This Vulcan Junior is a cast alloy toy sewing machine, from the Cyldon factory, Fleet Lane, Poole, Dorset. It makes a simple chainstitch using a looper.
Sydney S Bird started the company at Enfield in Essex before moving to Dorset in 1953. Their first machine closely resembled the Singer 20, followed by a model collectors call the Featherweight, after the Singer Featherweight, and then the futuristic looking Junior to be followed by the Countess and the electric versions called the Classic and Regal. Circa 1955.      Top
This is a Vulcan Countess toy from the Cyldon factory, Fleet Lane, Poole, Dorset. It is larger than the earlier machines and has a free-arm with a detachable iron workplate. The action is a basic chainstitch with the tension provided by a friction pad on the bobbin. In comparison to many other toy machines it is vert well made.
Sydney S Bird started the company at Enfield in Essex before moving to Dorset in 1953. Their first machine closely resembled the Singer 20, followed by a model collectors call the Featherweight, after the Singer Featherweight, and then the futuristic looking Junior to be followed by the Countess and the electric versions called the Classic and Regal.      Top

A Comet by EMG, made in Dover, England, from the 1950’s.

Alex Askaroff, has the only source I could find on this company here.

It is tinplate and not very rigid and employs a flat plate version of the Gibbs rotating hook to form a twisted chain stitch. There seems to be a lot of these about in fair condition, probably because they do not work very well.      Top